Short Story Writing Competition 2020 | Closed until 2021

CSSP

The Commonwealth Short Story Writing  Competition 2021 is now open. If you are a writer with dreams of seeing how your story writing skills stack up against the competition, this competition is for you. There is still time to complete write a short story using 2,000-5000 words before the deadline. 

The Commonwealth Short Story Prize 2021 opened in late August and will close on November 1, 2020. If you are a ‘citizen’ of the Commonwealth – former British colonies..., you are eligible to enter. Your submission should be an unpublished piece, and may be done in one of the approved languages, so start writing. Regional winners as well as an overall winner will get cash prizes. Learn more about the Commonwealth Short Story Prize 2021 on this website

Why am I urging you to enter? I entered the 2019 competition when I stumbled upon the advertisement. I did not win any of the prizes offered by the competition but I won affirmation that I could do anything I set my mind to do. I took two days to complete the story and, if I say so myself, it is a good story. My reader, the person off whom I bounce bits of my writing, and who is experienced in assessing such work, gave me a rave review and a suggestion to improve the story. This story will be one of a collection of stories that I plan to make available soon. So, if you are from the Commonwealth and you are a writer, why not submit a story? You will reap your own benefits from doing so.

Before you go, why not read a few chapters of my new novel, MY OWN BIG WOMAN? Just click the link at the bottom of this post. If you like the story, buy the book and share the link. If the story is not your cup of tea, gift it to someone who you think will enjoy it.

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